Lucio FONTANA

The Players, 1919

Pencil and ink wash on paper
25.4 x 20.3 cm

1923, Irrigation, Zionist Development, Palestine, 1923

Oil on board
32 x 40.2 cm
Titled, dated and inscribed ‘authenticated by Lilian Bomberg’ on label verso

Paysage au Puits, c.1925-30

Oil on board
38 x 46 cm
Signed

Nude, c.1926

Oil on board
76 x 54.5 cm

The Steamer Normand on the Seine, c.1932

Pencil on paper
33 x 45 cm
Signed and dated verso

Fishing Boat, c.1936

Paint and pencil on metal
13 x 17 cm / 5 1/8 x 6 ¾ inches
Signed

Four Boats, c.1937

Oil and pencil

Lighthouse and Three Boats, c.1936

Oil and pencil on board
14.5 x 24 cm / 5 ¾ x 9 ½ inches

Saltash Bridge, c.1936

Gouache and pencil on card
22.6 x 30 cm / 9 x 11 7/8 inches
Signed

Two Masters, c.1936

Oil and pencil on board
17.2 x 40 cm / 6 3/4 x 15 3/4 inches
Signed

Ship in Dock, c.1937

Pencil and oil on paper
21.5 x 20.3 cm
Signed, inscribed ‘Ship in Dock’ and ‘Tide Out’

Two Luggers by a Headland, c.1937

Oil on card
18.4 x 30.5 cm
Signed

Seated Nude, 1939

Sanguine chalk on paper
38 x 25.5 cm / 15 x 10 inches
Signed, dated and inscribed with the opus number lower right; also signed upper right
Opus D.39-8

Two Houses and Two Trees, c.1939

Pencil and coloured crayon on paper
24.5 x 39 cm

Seated Nude – Courtyard, Greenleaves, c.1942

Oil on canvas
61 x 54.5 cm
Estate stamp verso

Still Life with Fruit, 1949

Oil on canvas
43 x 51 cm

Figurine

c.1950
Transparent hot modelled Murano glass with bright gold foil internal application
24.5 cm high

for Salviati, Nudo a Masello

1950
Murano glass
19 cm high

In the Night Blue Turns to Red, 1950

Oil on masonite
122 x 122 cm / 48 x 48 inches
Signed, dated and inscribed with the title and opus number verso

Nemi, near Rome, 1950

Oil on board
26 x 36 cm
Signed and dated verso

Porthleven Harbour, 1950

Oil on board
34 x 24 cm
Signed and dated, also signed and inscribed verso

Rabbit's Dream, 1950

Oil on masonite
60 x 70.5 cm
Signed, dated and inscribed with the title verso

Little Bracken, 1951

Oil and pencil on board
35.5 x 15 cm
Signed; also signed, inscribed and dated verso

November Landscape, 1951

Oil on canvas
152 x 91 cm
Signed and dated

Page 1 of 18

LUCIO FONTANA  Argentine-Italian, 1899-1968

Lucio Fontana was an Argentine-Italian painter, sculptor, ceramicist, and theorist who is best known as the founder of Spatialism.

Fontana studied sculpture at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera in Milan in 1920, but in 1922, he followed his family back to Argentina, where he worked at his father’s sculpting studio, Fontana y Scarabelli. In 1924, he set up his own studio in Rosario, and at the end of the 1920s, he returned to Milan to study at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera.

During the early 1930s, Lucio Fontana developed what is considered an important phase of his varied artistic work. At this time, Fontana produced figurative sculptures made out of terra-cotta reliefs, painted gypsum plates, and ceramics. His preference for creating figurative ceramic sculptures was not the result of his lack of familiarity with or affinity toward the then-intellectual artistic trends. In fact, in 1934, Fontana, Fausto Melotti, Atanasio Soldati, and Mauro Reggiani formed the Paris artist group Abstraction-Création, which embraced abstract art but tended toward more austere forms represented by concrete art and constructivism. In 1935, Fontana collaborated at Manifattura Giuseppe Mazzotti, a ceramics company in Albissola Marina, where he met other important avant-garde artists and intellectuals.

In Buenos Aires in 1946, he cowrote the “White Manifesto,” his first essay on spatialism, where he proposed the expansion of artwork into a fourth dimension. Back in Milan in 1947, Fontana founded the Movimento spaziale and wrote the “Primo Manifesto dello Spazialismo,” which called for a new form of space-oriented art focusing on the spatial qualities of sculpture and paintings and the inclusion of technology.

Even though Fontana is known as a painter, it was not until 1949, at the age of 50, when he resettled in Milan, Italy that he produced his first perforated canvases, in which he pierced the canvas and opened up the image area.

These stretched perforated canvases became Fontana’s signature contribution and defined his work throughout the 1950s. It was also in 1949 when Fontana created his first Spatial Environments, installations where he experimented with neon light tubes and space.

By the mid-1950s, Fontana had started his Pietre series, where he applied materials such as colored glass and stones, which extended the image into the real space, to his perforated paintings. In 1959 in Albissola Marina, Fontana created his Nature sculptural series, which consisted of large spheric and spheroid terra-cotta ball sculptures with cuts and holes.

In 1958, Fontana made his first slashed painting, which became his preferred language and technique. To create these paintings, Fontana applied copious amounts of paint uniformly onto the canvas, to then slash it while the paint was still wet. Once the paint dried, he adhered the back sides of the borders of the slash with gauze. In 1961, Fontana continued to experiment on his canvases by adding shiny reflective materials, such as gold and silver leaves, varnishes, mosaics, and other metals, to the surfaces.

Fontana was interested in the relationship between space, work, and visitor, and he collaborated with some of the most important Italian architects and designers of the time, including Gio Ponti Piero Portaluppi, Luciano Baldessari, and Marcello Grisotti. In 1951, he collaborated with architects Baldessari and Grisotti on the interiors of the IX Triennale di Milano, for which Fontana designed the neon ceiling installation.

Fontana stands out as one of the most important and influential Italian artists of his time.

Lucio FONTANA

Sculpture Project, 1952

Oil on canvas
81 x 121.5 cm

Round Stone Form, 1953

Stone
10 x 16.5 cm
Opus 1953/9
Conceived in 1953 this is a unique piece

Le Jardin, 1954

Oil on canvas
72.5 x 53 cm
Signed and dated; inscribed with the title verso
SPECIAL PRICE £5,500

Untitled, 1954

Oil on paper
49 x 38 cm / 19 ¼ x 15 inches

Untitled, 1954

Oil on paper
47.5 x 38 cm / 18 ¾ x 15 inches

Untitled, 1954

Oil on wooden panel
27 x 73 cm

Untitled, 1954

Oil on canvas
76 x 63 cm
Signed, titled and dated verso

Seated Woman with Square Head (version B), 1955

Bronze
Height 59 cm / 23 ¼ inches; Width 30 cm / 11 ¾ inches
Stamped with Susse Fondeur Paris foundry stamp (on the reverse of the base)
Conceived in 1955 and cast in an edition of 6 by Susse Fondeur Paris in 1957

The Hiding Place of Dragon, 1955

Oil on masonite
160 x 193 cm

Untitled, 1955

Oil on canvas
91.4 x 76 cm 
Signed and dated

View of Whitby, 1955

Pencil
27.9 x 20.3 cm
Signed and dated

Watergarden Dream, 1955

Oil on masonite
152.5 x 244 cm
Signed, dated and inscribed with title and opus number O.131 verso

Altar of the Snakes, 1956

Oil on board
152.5 x 122 cm
Signed, dated and inscribed with the title verso

Bird Cage No.1, 1956

Oil on board
122 x 152.5 cm
Opus O.165

Priest of the Red Temple, 1956

Oil on canvas
183 x 244 cm / 72 x 96 inches
Signed, dated and inscribed with the title verso

Shellfish Elements, 1956

Oil on board
122 x 152.5 cm
Signed, inscribed and dated 'Alan Davie 56/SHELL-FISH ELEMENTS' (verso)
Opus O.164

 

Crab Creation, 1957/58

Oil on board
122 x 183 cm
Opus O.238

Londonderry, 1957

Painted plaster
97 x 97 cm
Signed, titled and dated verso

Philosopher's Stone, 1957

Oil on board
152.5 x 198 cm
Signed, dated and inscribed with the title verso
Opus O.235

Snake's Objectives, 1957

Oil on masonite
122 x 101.5 cm / 48 x 40 inches
Signed, dated and inscribed with the title verso

Ascent of the Black Mountain, 1958

Oil on paper
42 x 53 cm
Signed, inscribed and dated
Opus OG.26A

Harbour Sunrise, 1958

Oil on paper
26.5 x 42 cm
Signed, inscribed and dated upper left 
(ADE – 0020)

Pandora, 1958-1962

Bronze, ebony and limestone
156.2 x 120.6 x 22.9 cm
Conceived in 1958-1962 this is a unique piece

Untitled No.17, 1958

Oil on paper laid on board
26.6 x 42 cm

Page 1 of 17

LUCIO FONTANA  Argentine-Italian, 1899-1968

Lucio Fontana was an Argentine-Italian painter, sculptor, ceramicist, and theorist who is best known as the founder of Spatialism.

Fontana studied sculpture at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera in Milan in 1920, but in 1922, he followed his family back to Argentina, where he worked at his father’s sculpting studio, Fontana y Scarabelli. In 1924, he set up his own studio in Rosario, and at the end of the 1920s, he returned to Milan to study at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera.

During the early 1930s, Lucio Fontana developed what is considered an important phase of his varied artistic work. At this time, Fontana produced figurative sculptures made out of terra-cotta reliefs, painted gypsum plates, and ceramics. His preference for creating figurative ceramic sculptures was not the result of his lack of familiarity with or affinity toward the then-intellectual artistic trends. In fact, in 1934, Fontana, Fausto Melotti, Atanasio Soldati, and Mauro Reggiani formed the Paris artist group Abstraction-Création, which embraced abstract art but tended toward more austere forms represented by concrete art and constructivism. In 1935, Fontana collaborated at Manifattura Giuseppe Mazzotti, a ceramics company in Albissola Marina, where he met other important avant-garde artists and intellectuals.

In Buenos Aires in 1946, he cowrote the “White Manifesto,” his first essay on spatialism, where he proposed the expansion of artwork into a fourth dimension. Back in Milan in 1947, Fontana founded the Movimento spaziale and wrote the “Primo Manifesto dello Spazialismo,” which called for a new form of space-oriented art focusing on the spatial qualities of sculpture and paintings and the inclusion of technology.

Even though Fontana is known as a painter, it was not until 1949, at the age of 50, when he resettled in Milan, Italy that he produced his first perforated canvases, in which he pierced the canvas and opened up the image area.

These stretched perforated canvases became Fontana’s signature contribution and defined his work throughout the 1950s. It was also in 1949 when Fontana created his first Spatial Environments, installations where he experimented with neon light tubes and space.

By the mid-1950s, Fontana had started his Pietre series, where he applied materials such as colored glass and stones, which extended the image into the real space, to his perforated paintings. In 1959 in Albissola Marina, Fontana created his Nature sculptural series, which consisted of large spheric and spheroid terra-cotta ball sculptures with cuts and holes.

In 1958, Fontana made his first slashed painting, which became his preferred language and technique. To create these paintings, Fontana applied copious amounts of paint uniformly onto the canvas, to then slash it while the paint was still wet. Once the paint dried, he adhered the back sides of the borders of the slash with gauze. In 1961, Fontana continued to experiment on his canvases by adding shiny reflective materials, such as gold and silver leaves, varnishes, mosaics, and other metals, to the surfaces.

Fontana was interested in the relationship between space, work, and visitor, and he collaborated with some of the most important Italian architects and designers of the time, including Gio Ponti Piero Portaluppi, Luciano Baldessari, and Marcello Grisotti. In 1951, he collaborated with architects Baldessari and Grisotti on the interiors of the IX Triennale di Milano, for which Fontana designed the neon ceiling installation.

Fontana stands out as one of the most important and influential Italian artists of his time.